Premature Death Statistic – Are You At Risk?

Another week – how’s yours been?

Last week I posted an entertaining piece about how life has changed over the last hundred years. Things we enjoy now could never even have been dreamed of in the early part of the 20th century.

What I didn’t inlcude was the top five leading causes of death. And I left it out because I wanted to do some research. Well I did, and here it is: Five leading causes of death in 1915 vs 2015

I created this graph to show how our health has changed over a 100 years.

What we see now is really a domination of lifestyle diseases on mortality rates (the 2015 statistics came from the National Health Scheme in the UK and the Australian Bureau of Statistics in Australia.)

Dementia aside (so much is unknown about this condition), our leading causes of illnesses are basically how we treat ourselves. No-one else is doing this to us – but us!

I think that is astounding information. Even more shocking, is that suicide is the leading cause of death for Australians between the ages of 15 and 44.

What can be done about it? The answers are easy to find – but perhaps not so simple to implement.

Here are the top 5 things I do to make sure I don’t end up on this list:

Food – I eat whole foods – farm fresh as often as I can source fruits & vegiesthem. Small amounts of protein (about the size of my palm) and large amounts of plant foods. Lots of nuts and seeds.And I have treats, good quality dark chocolate, and home made things like my paleo mini-muffins are a great way to have something sweet without eating foods laden with highly refined sugars and chemicals. I also make sure I take  good quality pro- and pre-biotics so my gut health is supported.

 

 

SuppNutrisearch independent Comparative Guidelementation – I take a quality nutritional supplement – because no matter how good the quality of my food is, the quality of our soil and modern farming practices have reduced the minerals that are now in our food (more detailed information on this is in my upcoming book – I will certainly let you know when it’s coming out!)

This book on the left here (The Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements) is an independent study of the supplements on the market (there is one for North America, and one for Australia/ New Zealand.) It’s what I used to make my choice for pharmaceutical grade, athlete quality supplements.

 

Exercise – I exercise every day so I’m building muscle, strong bones and flexibility. This will help me as I age because I won’t be at the mercy of falling over, breaking bones and ending up sitting in a chair all day (or worse.) I’ve been sharing my progress on this blog so feel free to go into the Archives and check out what I’ve been doing.

As you probably know if you’ve been reading my blog, I have an exercise physiologist who I see every eight weeks or so, and she reviews my routine and makes adjustments. This last visit saw my weights training move up a significant notch – which I find really exciting and challenging! I’ve found having a ‘coach’ really helps keep me on track.

 

Active mind and social connection – I keep my mind active with reading, researching (for my book as well as for my own benefits), crossword puzzles and word games, sudokus. I keep socially connected through memberships so I get to hang out with interesting people, some who may not have the same ideas as me, which challenges my thinking.
newspaper crossword

 

 

Reflection and gratitude – I meditate regularly and keep a gratitude journal. woman meditating
Reflection helps me focus on quiet and silence, and helps me have a place where I can do some dedicated, mindful breathing. This helps my nervous system stay in the calm place, not the being-chased-by-a-tiger place where I lived in my corporate career.

Gratitude because, well, there is so much to be thankful for: my loving husband, the beautiful place where I live, my ability to travel, good friends – the list goes on. I believe it’s really important to acknowledge how thankful I am for the life I live.

 

What are you doing so you don’t become a victim of your lifestyle? I’d love you to share your suggestions and ideas – that way we can all learn from each other!

If you want to see something truly extraordinary, check out my EnrichYourEnergy Facebook page for the post I did on Thursday 24 March about Ernestine Shepherd, the oldest female body builder in the world. Then try to give yourself an excuse for not caring about yourself!!

Until next week,201507 me in green copy 200 pixel

Cheers, Meredith

Five Fabulous Tips For Healthy, Beautiful Skin

We often take our skin for granted. We go out in all weathers (because we have to) and it burns, gets dried by the wind, gets affected by smog, pollution and radiation (from things like TVs and computers).

Some of us smoke, drink too much alcohol, party and/or work too hard. We push ourselves.

Our skin is extraordinary. It keeps our insides in, and the bacteria and nasties out. Mostly. And rarely do we think about this wonderful organ, our biggest organ, in fact – seriously.

Just think about that for a moment…. 

When we think of looking after our organs we think heart, lungs, liver, kidneys but often don’t put a lot of thought into caring for our skin. And I’m not just talking about skin care (although that does play a part.)

There are many things we can do to look after our skin, so here are 5 Fabulous Tips:

  1. Drink lots of water. I know, I know, boring huh? You read it everywhere. But why? And how much? The current thinking is eight glasses a day – which is about eight cups (a cup is 250ml). It’s not hard to do and won’t make you pee all day once your body has adjusted. And you can infuse your water too. Mix ginger and mint; or any citrus and ginger or other herbs; you can steep lemon balm and then cool it down; you can add berries, too for natural flavour (whatever you use should be tossed out within 48 hours). Hydration plumps your cells, which helps reduce wrinkles. Just as an example, Elle McPherson drinks three litres of water a day – and her skin looks terrific! .
    I drink at least two litres of water a day and I’m really seeing the benefits.
  2. Get a good night’s sleep. We are often so pushed during the day and then sleep eludes us at night, creating a vicious cycle. Here are some tips that might help you if you have trouble sleeping:
    • have a cool bedroom, 22 degree celsius is ideal
    • don’t have animals or children in bed with you, as they can interrupt your sleep
    • turn down the lights gradually two hours before retiring, so your body is gets ready
    • don’t eat dinner within three hours of retiring, and don’t snack after dinner
    • avoid stimulants such as vigorous exercise, coffee, alcohol or sugar before bed
    • keep all electronics (TV, mobile phone, tablet) out of the bedroom (a red-light clock radio is ok), and don’t look into any of these items within two hours of retiring. These items shine on the back of your retina, tricking your brain into staying awake
    • write in your journal, listen to gentle music, do a five minute meditation or reflection before turning out the light, as this will calm your mind
  3. Remove your make up before bed. Night time is when our skin replenishes and renews, so don’t make the job too hard! It only takes a minute or so each night, but will help give you a lifetime of clear skin.
  4. Use a quality skin care (click here to see what I use). This includes making sure it is free of any nasty chemicals such as parabens, sodium laurel suphates (SLS), triclosans, and formaldehyde, just to name a few. If you want a full list of the nasty stuff cosmetic companies have been known to include in their products, check out what Dr David Suzuki at the Environmental Working  Group has to say. The EWG has a load of consumer information about what’s really in our cosmetics, and our food. Choose skincare that is botanically based, free of nasty chemicals, is full of vitamins and antioxidants. Look for a range that is truly nutritious, one that will support cell strength, as this will help you keep wrinkles at bay!
  5. Eat loads of Omega 3 fats. Sources include salmon and tuna (fresh and wild, not canned and farmed), nuts such as walnuts and macadamias, flaxseeds, avocado, olives. Why? These fats strengthen the cell wall, which serves two purposes:
    1) they acts as a barrier to nasties wanting to get into your cells, and
    2) they act as a pathway for nutrients to move in and out of the cells. These foods also help reduce inflammation in our bodies – and inflammation can increase the look of aging skin.
    omega 3s
    There are many people who can’t eat what is required for a diet rich in Omega 3’s – and if you are one of those there are quality nutritional supplements you can take that can make like easier for yo
    u.  There is much public discussion about the value of supplementation – some say we don’t need it, some say we do. My personal view is that our farming practices are so tainted and our food so reduced in vitamins and minerals, through over farming and use of pesticides, herbicides and even worse, GMO, that supplementation is a necessity for good health (and, for what it’s worth, the American Medical Association agrees). Nutrisearch independent Comparative Guide
    If you do choose supplementation, do yourself a favour and don’t just buy what’s on sale in the supermarket, or even the pharmacy or drug store. Do you research, or check
    ut what I take – I’ve done LOADS of research and have found what I think are the best – and the independent Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements agrees. It pays to be particularly careful of taking fish oil – you want to be guaranteed that the mercury and other toxins, so prevalent in many fish today, have been safely removed.

So these are just a few tips on how to look after your skin. I’m currently writing my first book on keeping your skin healthy and beautiful, and will certainly let you know when you can get a copy when I’m done!

Until then, stay healthy, and care for yourself!

cheers, Meredith

Me in August 2015
Me in August 2015